Category Archives: Mobile Web

Albatross Paragliding

We are very proud to see the launch of one of our new websites… Albatross Paragliding! This website was commissioned by a client whom we manage a couple of sites for. These include ET Games, and MonkeyPuzzle.

The spec for Albatross Paragliding, was to have something simple and to include a paragliding video as a central element within the site. The video sees Dave (the instructor) paraglide over the stunning scenery of Hampshire.

Overall, the new site and logo took Mike a few days, and we feel the simplistic look gives the site a fun, fresh and exhilarating look. The pictures and video have also provided a great topic of interest within the office….would you or wouldn’t you?!?!


Creating a Mobile Navigation

Today I’m going to give you a short tutorial on how to create a mobile navigation. This mobile navigation will slide in from the left side of the page. Here you will find everything you need to create the nav including how to animate the hamburger icon and the JavaScript needed to open and close the menu.

We will start with the html needed to create the menu:

The first step is to wrap the whole navigation in a ‘nav’ tag, this a new HTML5 tag which represents a section of code with the purpose of providing links. Next is the navigation toggle (the div which will be the trigger for opening and closing the nav), this will have a class of ‘nav-toggle’ and contain the hamburger icon to indicate where the user should click to open the menu. Three span elements will be placed into the ‘nav-toggle’ div, these will be used to create the hamburger bars. The main styling of these bars will be implemented using the ‘bar’ class and the positioning will be done through the ‘id’ assigned to them.

Finally we create a div with the class ‘nav’ that’ll hold the logo of the company as well as the ‘ul’ containing all the links needed. For now we will add a ‘#’ inside the ‘href’ as a placeholder, later this will be swapped for the url you’d like the link to direct to. This code will give you the very basic structure ready to be styled with CSS.

Moving on to the styling will start with the ‘nav toggle’. We want this to be set to ‘position: fixed’ so it follows us as we move down the page, if it wasn’t then the user would have to scroll up the page just to open the menu. Once the position is set to ‘fixed’ we can move the toggle to where we’d like it, I want mine to be sat at the top of the page to the left. Here is how:

If you’d like yours to sit to the right of the page swap ‘left: 10px’ for ‘right: 10px’.

Continuing the styling of the nav toggle we set a height and width of 40px along with a background colour. The colour we’re using in the tutorial is one which matches the clients colour scheme, but you can use any colour you choose. This will leave us with a small green square, we want our toggle to be a circle though so let’s add a border-radius of 50%. Add the following code to the previous block:

To finish of the main styles for the nav we will add a box-shadow to make it stand out from the page and a z-index so it stays above other elements on the page. Finally we need to set cursor to ‘pointer’, this changes the cursor on hover and without it iOS devices won’t trigger a JavaScript click event. Below is the complete css for ‘nav-toggle’ and how it should look in your browser:

Now we have the toggle styled we need to add the hamburger bars. This is a simple process as the ‘bar’ class has been added to all three necessary elements one block of code will style all three. The CSS is relatively straight forward. ‘Position’ needs to be set to ‘absolute’ so we can move them easily into place, and the ‘display’ set to ‘block’ so it can be given a height and width.

A nice trick here as they’re positioned absolute it to set the margin to auto and left and right to 0, this automatically centres them inside the nav toggle. Here are all the styles needed to make the hamburger bars.

If you were to refresh your page now you’d the nav toggle with one single bar at the very top, this is due to them currently set to the same position. All three bars are there they’re just sat on top of one another. This is where the ID’s come in, we need to target each bars ID and space them out evenly.

We can leave the nav toggle and return later when it comes to animating the hamburger ‘bars’.

Now for the navigation. We need the nav to stay on the side of page no matter how far the user has scrolled down, for this set the position of ‘.nav’ to fixed. Once the navigation is stuck to our scroll position it’s time to set the height and width. For the height a simple 100% is needed here for it to be the full height of the screen regardless of the device it’s viewed on. Width can be whatever you’d like, for the tutorial we’re going to use 230px. The starting code for the nav should look like this.

The final nav styles for now include a background colour which again is up to you what you choose, we will run with the colour scheme already in use and pick a lighter green that’s slightly transparent. The background colour style will be set to an rgba colour so we can specify the alpha, our is ‘rgba(126, 160, 97, .95)’. To make sure it always sits on top of the page elements a z-index of 5 needs to be set. The complete nav styles so far are:

Next is a very simple setup for the ul, only two styles needed here. First being ‘list-style: none’ this removes the the bullet points next the list items. The second style is for the padding, removing the default padding and adding a slight bit of padding to the right, we will use the shorthand here and set all 4 sides with one line ‘padding: 0 12px 0 0’.

For the list items themselves we only need another two styles, the font styling itself will be placed on the ‘a’ tag within the list items. Here we space out the list items with a margin bottom of .65em and align the text to the right.

On the ‘a’ tag we will set the font size, font colour and the remove the default underline an ‘a’ tag gives. You will see the sizes and colour we use below but you can pick your own to match the project you’re working on.

When it comes to nav logo depending on the size and content you may need to style this differently than us but for the logo the client uses to position it properly we use the following styles.

Now the nav is completely styled we can move on to making it functional. The first part of making it functional is to hide the nav from view, this is done with a transform style. We need to add ‘transform: translateX(-100%)’ to the ‘.nav’, this hides the nav off the page to the left.

We also need to create the class that we will add to the nav later with javascript. We add this class to the containing nav element in CSS and call this class open with the style ‘transform: translateX(0)’. When this class has been added the nav will sit where it did before we added the previous ‘transform: translateX(-100%)’.

The javascript is actually a very simple piece of code which once ‘.nav-toggle’ has been clicked toggles the class ‘open’ on the nav element. It’s the only piece of code needed and looks like this: (Make sure you have jQuery added to your project)

If you test this now you will notice two things, first being that when the nav shows it just jumps into place rather that sliding smoothly. Second, the nav toggle doesn’t indicate in anyway that it’s been clicked. We will change these two things now.

Starting with the animation side of things we will add a transition to a few elements to make sure that the nav slides in and the nav toggle bars will animate properly.

Another quick test and you will see the nav now slides in and out smoothly, you can either speed or slow down this transition by changing the .3s for whatever you’d like.

The very last part of this is to animate to nav toggle and hamburger bars on click. We need to add a few styles to the ‘.nav-toggle’ container, these being the position, background colour and box-shadow colour. We add a transform set to ‘transform: translateX(167px)’, if you changed the width of the nav you may need to adjust this. The background colour change is just to make it slightly more transparent and the box shadow is to change it to completely transparent. The styles for these changes are:

The styles for the hamburger bars are simple but effective, we start by adding a transition delay to ‘.bars’ which applies to all 3 and then move to individually styling each bar. The first bar takes a transform which moves it down 7px and rotates it 45 degrees. The second bar gets hidden by an opacity set to 0. And last but not least the third bar gives given the same styles applied as the first but swapped to negative, it’s moved up by -7px and rotated -45 degrees. All 4 style declarations are below for you to see.

If you’ve followed this tutorial through you should now have a fully functional nav bar that’ll work and look great on both mobile and desktops. We will shortly be adding a demo page where you can interact and dissect it if you curious about anything… Enjoy!


4 Modern Website Layout Examples

Layouts have not changed an awful lot since the release of CSS3 and HTML5. The days of using tables to layout a website are long gone yet websites still feel table like. There are benefits of having an unorthodox layout. No matter your trade you will always have competitors and I bet a lot of those competitors have similar websites (table like). Will a user remember one hundred similar layouts or the one that was different?


CSS3 has really changed the way we can style elements on a page. Using transform we can alter the appearance of nearly any element. Giving us the power to create some really unique layouts. Rotating squares into diamonds is one of the more basic examples; nonetheless very unique compared to its square cousin.


The layout I have created can be used in a number of ways. An e-commerce store may use the two side diamonds as links for either men or women. They could be used as image placeholders to accompany the text in the centre. Whatever you choose this is a sure fired way to ensure a memorable site.

Box Overlay

Overlaying boxes on a traditional looking website can really impact its appearance and break the mould. Using shadows you can effectively turn the content inside into high priority areas for your call to actions (cta). Users are more likely to scan those areas of the page before anywhere else. Overlapping the boundaries of the layout beneath can also add to the effect.


This layout would be great for a personal blog, the longer box to the left can act as an effective side bar while the posts can be placed to the right. The featured post can occupy the top of the page, its image being inside of the overlaying square.


There are a couple of ways to achieving this effect. The easiest is to use a Javascript grid layout library called Masonry, it sorts all of the boxes into optimal positions to prevent huge vertical spaces. As quoted from their website “sort of like a mason fitting stones into a wall”. This means you can have many different shapes and sizes all fitting nicely next to and beneath one another.

The sidebar is also a less common feature and takes up a fraction of the space compared to more traditional versions. Using icons and single words allows the sidebar to become less of a prominent feature but remaining just as useful.


This layout again can be used for blogs but also for dashboards. The boxes can contain important information for the website owner such as statistics or quick actions etc.


This final concept is the most traditional looking of them all but it still has its unique qualities. The majority of websites use CSS to include margin between their sections. A marginless layout throws that out of the window and uses padding instead to create its white space. If you can get the correct colours and images then these layouts can look amazing.


These types of sites are great if your trying to sell a single product or advertise your business online.

Hopefully by now you have a few ideas you can take away with you to start building some truly unique looking layouts. It does however take more then just a great layout to build a memorable website but its the foundation on which everything else will be placed. Have a favourite layout? let us know in the comments.

Blayne Phillips

New Websites, Great Clients!

Over the bank holiday weekend Tidy Design launched a new website for the Royal Beach Hotel in Southsea, Portsmouth. Over the years we have designed several hotel websites, working closely with hotel owners, duty managers and key staff to deliver results…


We are very happy with the new site; it is great to have another hotel on our books and to be working with established local businesses such as The Best Western Royal Beach Hotel. Stay tuned for more news and more new websites; we have another going live tomorrow – Yippee!

Mapping out a website

There are many ways to start developing a new website; you could start writing the code, create a couple of mock-ups in Photoshop, map out page layouts on a whiteboard or in a notepad…


Information architecture (IA) is an important part of web design however it can often get overlooked. This could be the result of a small development budget or an “ASAP” deadline. How developers allocate their time will certainly impact the overall cost and ETA of a project.

A lot of thought/planning should go into a new website, be it a single page site or full-blown web application – Structural design and information is very important. If you require assistance mapping out a website then please visit our Web Design Process page. Good luck and thanks for visiting…

Fix mobile usability issues found on…


You may have received a notification from Google, regarding the requirements to update your web site so that it is compliant and compatible with the ubiquitous mobile device.

Why is this happening? Well, most of us (if not all) have a smart phone, maybe a tablet device too. Using a website that has the additional code to allow mobile functionality now becomes a pleasure, rather than a chore.

Google have some key details with what it means for a website to be mobile compliant Mobile Usability if you would like further reading, but in summary this is:

  • A defined viewing area – this means that whether you’re using an older generation smart phone, a brand-new cutting-edge tablet device or a computer system with a high-resolution display, the website dynamically adjusts to fit (within reason, of course) the display of the device.
  • Content that flows – if you have browsed a website on a mobile device and had to move the screen around the read the contents, a mobile friendly site resolves these issues.
  • Fonts that scale – for easier reading on small screens.
  • Easy-to-touch-elements – buttons that are well-spaced from other touch elements
  • Visual design and motion – driven by mobile-friendly technology.

What we have here is Google reminding us, the designers and builders of your site that it isn’t ‘mobile friendly’ and a terse warning that the web-pages will not rank well in a mobile search.

Reading further into this, we expect a new mobile-site ranking algorithm to soon launch.

As you may expect, we are receiving a reasonable volume of the Google sent email and from both new and existing customers. If you would like us to implement mobile functionality with your site, please do not hesitate to contact us.

Kind regards,
Jonathan Tawn

Working with the NHS

Today we have been putting the finishing touches to a new NHS web application; My Birthplace is a great little app with lots of potential and lots planned for 2014!

My Birthplace

My Birthplace –

Working with Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust has been pretty awesome, it took a few meetings and a design concept or two to get this project confirmed however we have built up a great working relationship. Stay tuned for more news on My Birthplace plus a couple of other NHS apps we are now discussing – Exciting times for all involved!

Visit My Birthplace

College Website Design

Back in 2007 Tidy Design started work on a website for Portsmouth Language College, several years later and so much has changed!! Last week we updated Portsmouth, Southampton, Chichester and Winchester Language Colleges – The spec; a bespoke mobile site for each college…

College Website Design

College Website Design

Working with TEG (Tompkins Education Group) is pretty cool, they are one of many clients we have seen grow from strength to strength over the years. It is an honour to be part of their journey as a company and a pleasure to have regular meetings with the founder of TEG, to discuss business over a beer…

Keeping People on Your Website

Improving user satisfaction is very important when it comes to Google and online success. If web pages are incomplete, broken or neglected then this can impact organic search results.

Keeping People on Your Website

Anyone who studies SEO (Search Engine Optimsiation) or monitors online search will know that Google’s Panda algorithm will punish “low-quality” websites – This update revolutionised the industry of SEO…

Keeping people on your website is now more important than ever. We can all look to improve our sites, the user experience, fine tune or freshen up old content, delivering the best possible results to our future visitors. Remember; Google will take into account how satisfied a user is when they visit a site… If a person visits then hits the back button to check out the other search results on Google, we can presume they are not satisfied.

If you have any comments related to this post then please do add them below; we would love to hear from you. Thanks for stopping by :)

Are You Mobile Yet?

With tablets widely predicted to overtake shipments of desktop PCs and laptops later this year, it remains likely that tablets will continue to enjoy strong growth in the years ahead.

Are You Mobile Yet?

The mobile devices market is gaining strength, with tablets and smartphones gaining on the PC market and continuing to do so.

Hybrid phone-tablet devices may eventually merit recognition as a separate category in their own right and it is widely believed that smartphones will represent the vast majority of connected device shipments.

It will be interesting to see how technological developments proceed in years to come. One possibility is that a convertible device – capable of running both Android and Windows – will emerge as a stand-alone tablet.

With the advance of mobile technology, the question of how your business chooses to respond and adapt to meet customer demand becomes increasingly important.

Kerry McPhail